Bangalore loses 1 million liters of water per day due to Cauvery pipeline leak



The Bangalore Water Supply and Sewerage Board (BWSSB) decided to proceed with a major water shutdown on Wednesday and Thursday to stop a six-month-old leak in one of its Cauvery pipelines.

For six long months, water has been leaking from the main water line from Thorekadanahalli (TK Halli) to the city. (File photo)

The Bangalore Water Supply and Sewerage Board (BWSSB) decided to carry out a major water shutdown on Wednesday and Thursday (June 30 and July 1) to stop a six-month-old leak in one of its pipelines in Cauvery.

For six long months, water has been leaking from the main water line from Thorekadanahalli (TK Halli) to the city.

Officials told India Today that water wastage has increased in recent days, forcing BWSSB authorities to take immediate action. In fact, a million liters of water per day was wasted due to this delay in rectifying the leak in the pipeline. The reason for the delay would be the Covid-19 crisis and the lack of manpower.

The city receives water from the Shiva Anicut reservoir along the Cauvery River which runs a distance of over 100 km.

This water then reaches the TK Halli reservoir by gravity and is then pumped to the city through three pumping stations and gigantic pipelines.

It was in 2002 when this particular pipeline was laid and as of now officials say the isolation valves need to be replaced because they are damaged.

In order to replace part of the 5.6 km pipeline with a new one, authorities will shut off water supplies for two days in many parts of the city.

The main pipeline enters the city at two points Kothanur Dinne and Hegganahalli. This water is then pumped to ground level reservoirs across the city. As a result, the water supply in areas falling under phase IV of Cauvery water (phase I) will be affected.

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