Marine weather forecast: rain, wind, warmer temperatures


  • Part of North San Pedro Road in China Camp State Park is submerged during a rising tide in San Rafael on Monday, January 3, 2022. (Alan Dep / Marin Independent Journal)

  • Part of North San Pedro Road in China Camp State Park is submerged during a rising tide in San Rafael on Monday, January 3, 2022. (Alan Dep / Marin Independent Journal)

  • A pickup truck crosses a flooded section of North San Pedro Road in China Camp State Park in San Rafael during a rising tide on Monday, January 3, 2022 (Alan Dep / Marin Independent Journal)

  • Water from the bay drains onto the North San Pedro Road in China Camp State Park in San Rafael during a rising tide on Monday, January 3, 2022. (Alan Dep / Marin Independent Journal)

  • Part of North San Pedro Road in China Camp State Park is submerged during a rising tide in San Rafael on Monday, January 3, 2022. (Alan Dep / Marin Independent Journal)

  • The driver of an SUV decides to turn around after encountering a flooded section of North San Pedro Road in China Camp State Park in San Rafael during a rising tide on Monday, January 3, 2022 (Alan Dep / Marin Independent Journal)

  • Nicasio Reservoir in Nicasio on Monday January 3, 2022. The latest data from MMWD shows the Nicasio Reservoir at 85% of its capacity. (Alan Dep / Marin Independent Journal)

Marin County had a wet start to the year, with rising tides covering the shores and more rain on the way.

Light and sporadic showers subsided across most of the Bay Area on Tuesday, while North Bay could see rain until Wednesday morning before a two-day lull, according to the National Weather Service.

At 1:15 p.m. Tuesday, the 24-hour total precipitation included 4.11 inches over Mount Tamalpais and 2.95 inches at Kentfield.

Another weather system is expected to enter the area early Friday morning, with rain forecast of about a tenth of an inch to a half inch in North Bay. Coastal mountains could receive 1 to 2 inches of rain. The East Bay, San Francisco, and South Bay could be about a quarter of an inch or less with the Santa Cruz Mountains expected to receive up to an inch of rain.

Although Monday technically marked the end of the “royal tides” which brought in some of the highest and lowest ocean waters of the year, a swell also moved towards the west coast which reinforced the high tides and flooded low areas, including footpaths, sidewalks, roads and underpasses.

A coastal flood advisory, originally issued by the Weather Service Saturday through Monday at 2 p.m. for parts of the San Francisco Bay shoreline, was extended until 3 p.m. Tuesday.

Temperatures are expected to be balmy this week, with highs in the 50s to 60s and overnight lows going into the 40s. This weekend, overnight lows are expected to fall between 30 and 30 for the interior valleys.

Westerly winds will blow over the inland area but are not expected to be too strong. Friday could be windy when the next rainstorm arrives, with intermittent gusts forecast between 15 and 20 miles per hour.

Sierra Nevada is expected to receive a few more inches of snow through Tuesday, with Donner Pass, Kingvale and Blue Canyon forecast 6 to 8 inches of snow, according to the weather service. Echo Pass was expected to get 1-2 inches while South Lake Tahoe should get less than an inch.

Most of California was mired in “extreme” or “exceptional” drought after two consecutive dry winters, but rainstorms in December helped ease conditions for the state. California fell from 80% of the state in the “extreme” drought classification on December 7 to 33% on December 28.

“One of the best things about December being a wet month is that it has helped us with the rain that we have received during the water year and since we are in season. drought, this is useful for our water supply, ”said Brooke Bingaman of the National Weather Service.

Snowstorms that dumped several feet of powder in the Sierra Nevada mountains last month also pushed the statewide snowpack to 150% of historical averages on Tuesday, according to the California Department of Resources. in water. It’s also 55% of what water managers expect to see by April 1.

More rain is still needed to help eliminate the remainder of the long-term drought.

“January, February and March tend to be where we get most of the precipitation during the winter, so it will be interesting to see if we get beneficial rains this season or if we tend to be drier again.” , Bingaman mentioned.

The seven reservoirs in the Marin municipal water district filled from 32% of their capacity in October to nearly 93% on Monday. The tanks are usually about 76% full at this time of year.

The independent journal Natalie Hanson contributed to this report.


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